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at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
, national security law on both sides. we are very pleased to announce the book cover has received the 2012 american graphic design award and it is our hope not only will the outside win an award but perhaps the inside. .. critical and important debates. we have one of the senior members working in the back. we want to think jack for being here and all the support that you have given, not only in the book but our committee since you have joined the bar association. appreciated. i speak on behalf of all of our committee. we are pleased to say that we have a number of positive responses. the former national counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking abo
, the laws of egypt definitely forbids this underage marriage. the laws of nigeria forebit this conduct. turned out in fact this was a man, a serial pedophile, gets a younger one. the media scream they're heads off, the women's organizations scream they're head off but that man today, the senator, never prosecuted. on the other hand he claimed, he said anything that the koran says i should do, i will do. anything the koran says i shouldn't do, i won't do. and nowhere does the koran say i cannot marry an underage girl. the laws of two countries are stronger -- superior to the nation's constitution. of course, screams and articles and so on, but important things, until today not been prosecuted. so they have no moral authority to promulgate an edict like this. >> another question here. yes, gentleman six rows back, and thin mirian moorehead. >> thank you, doctors. i feel that we can say the -- one of the things you find around the world, about religion, most countries that actually kept original religion, compared with the development right now, kept their religion or developed far superi
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to declare obamacare constitutional, which is a little scary, that that highest justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went
of privileges. whether criminal law or otherwise. other privileges as well. as an office, we were required to be under certain things. but i really touch on areas that i did not have to run my butt by the treasury department in any way shape or form. they weren't happy about the hard truth that i tried to deliver in this book. so it really wasn't -- i really didn't do anything or go in any of those areas. you know, sometimes a little frustrating because there were things i wanted to explore, but i thought it was safer and easier to come nowhere close outline. i felt i could tell the story without having to just go there. so i think that was it. next steps, right now, i'm teaching at nyu school of law. which i am just enjoying and loving. they were so supportive of the process of me writing this book. i'm not sure what's next. but it's been a crazy and wonderful ride. even though i had a hard time in washington in a lot of respects, i would never give back a second of the time. serving the country and went out to do,, i feel blessed and fortunate. working with the amazing men and women who
walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't want a recall. he was an inspiration for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking p
. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and don't forget to tune into varney 9:20 sharp. and nicole-- okay, we'll go back to nicole, as soon as we find her, she's wandering the floor of the nyse. and stuart may be out this christmas eve, that doesn't mean he isn't spreading holiday cheer. liston what he has to say at 10:45, a christmas message from stuart. meanwhile, we are headed towards the fiscal cliff and if congress doesn't act soon the the u.s. economy could take a nosedive right off it. all this have comes as capitol hill, could a value-added tax be in the pipeline? are we slowly turning to europe. david, good to see you. and we already see us moving in terms of spending to the european model. will we move in terms of tax policy to the european model, specifically to a value-added tax like they have in most of europe? >> personally i think we should. >> on top of what we have, on top of an income tax. >> we need to cut back and what i would cut back is replacement for the
. >> nancy, you went to harvard law school. you went to oxford. you could have done so many things. how did you end up at the white house? >> i could have done many things and i have done many things. i started off as a lawyer. i am from a small town. my mom raised three kids on her own. she did not have a college education, but she is viewed in me that i could have one. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know that she wanted me to do very well in school. when i would talk to her about one in to work in the white house sunday or being interested in politics, she would say you have to study hard and get good grades because you will need a scholarship. i cannot afford it, but she never said i could not do it. that was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i went to law school. in the early 1980's, when i got out of law school and was going around to law firms, even at that point, there were not many women in law firms. people would sit me down and say, do you understand that if we take you into this law firm, you will have to try cases? [laughter] t
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
no people were injured. gregg: yeah, there you go. heather: with the new year comes more than 200 new laws going on the books and trace will be back with that and a breakdown for us. gregg: just when you thought it was over, new warnings of another little storm heading for the storm-ravaged northeast. we'll get a live report in minutes. heather: and new controversy over a move by russia's president that critics say is playing politics with the lives of orphans. what it could mean for americans who want to adopt overseas. our legal panel debates. i greg: welcome back. jenna: a fox extreme weather alert. this is no system bringing heavy wind and rain and snow to the northeast for dumping as much as 1.5 feet of snow on new york and pennsylvania. after devastating parts of the golf coast with tornadoes speak to the system is moving slowly north. but don't put away the snow shovels yet. there is another storm on the way. jenna: maria molina joins us with the very latest. reporter: you guys are right. we have another snow system that will dump a lot more snow over the northeast, and it actually
to this crisis. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. >> it hasn't got ensigned into law. there's no success yet there. >> boehner should move it tomorrow. he should just do that. >> jonathan? >> listen, the president campaigned on a three to one spending reduction and we're not see anything spending here. democrats controlled two-thirds of the chips. >> joy ann, why is this all about taxes? >> one reelection and the -- it doesn't do that much spending. >> it's been all about taxes. >> all about raising taxes. >> there's this obsession with raising taxes. >> it was to go after school lunches and elderly care, health care for poor kids and increased spending. >> no, no, no, they want entitlement reform, joy ann. why this obsession with cutting old people's medicare? >> it's not an obsession about cutting benefits to the elderly, joy ann. it's about reforming medicare over time so at some point in the future we don't tell an 80-year-old you know what? you're not going get the medicare cha you thought you would have. this is about not hurting the elderly. >> the republican solution is to hand 80-ye
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you rested not just at night, but also had a break during the day. >> and health-care professionals say it is still a good idea. they recommend a 20-minute midday nap. they say it makes a difference at night. than a 10% of insomnia cases are chronic, and they are usually caused by work. we over lows hour days to the point where we no longer sleep well. we do not give ourselves break, and when we need more time, we t
to have to mobilize. a lot will depend on the consciences of people who opposed the laws and have a change of heart. >> and kevin, six week ago, approximately, we had an election. >> you noticed that. >> what did you see? what patterns did you see? what lessons can you take from what the voting was? >> i think there are several things. one is the there is a big cautionary tale in this election for republicans and for conservative religious groups who want to put an emphasis on the hot button social issues. gay marriage, abortion, and this year, rape, surprisingly. that's not going to be enough to win anymore. and they can't just rely on the traditional white evangelical base to win anymore. they need to broadenhetent. if they push too hard on some of these conservative, really conservative social issues, it will end up alienating and i think we saw that in a lot of the senate races. so i think the key takeaway from this year's election was that it would be broader. what that means for religious people, it will need to be a broader set of issues that they get involved in. >> one of my favor
they didn't commit a federal crime or were sentenced far longer than the law allows. >>> the health care sector is vulnerable to hackers. hospital commutersputers and medical divisions have holes that could cause hackers to get patient's information. >>> obesity may be declining for the first time. the age of obese obese children age 2-4 fell. >>> and netflix is blaming amazon for an outage. netflix says it was traced back to a amazon web services. >> the cloud does not always protect you. >>> storm clouds still over the bay area. the heaviest rain showers have left us but we still have scattered showers and they are going to continue throughout the afternoon. so you're going to need and umbrella. here's a live look at our hi- def doppler. want to zoom in towards the south bay. that's where we're actually seeing a good sized cell now moving over parts of san jose, 880, 101, and 280. here's a look at your forecast over the next several days. we have a dry break by tomorrow and rain returns friday into saturday. >>> this national weather report sponsored by macy'
attraction. >> with the new law, more russians will buy. they want to come here and spend time with their families. >> this year, she has sold 15 properties to russians. when the new law is introduced, she hopes to sell a lot more. >> i think spain is an attractive country for russians. they like the culture. they seem to feel more at home here than in other countries. >> the spanish government is desperate to kickstart the ailing property section. construction was the engine of the democrats. the bubble burst sidling the banks with over $240 billion in bad debt. across spain, there is a glut of 700,000 unsold properties. the offer of residency permits is meant to sweeten the deal and attract foreign buyers, especially from russia and. >> the size of the problem is important. the only thing we can do to dispose of those properties, to sell the minimarkets, would be very helpful for the spanish economy.
. with regard to legal immigration, think the rule ofn law is remaining the best way oe making sure that people don't come into the country illegally. the risk of an amnesty that is basically all that we are talking about unfortunately is amnesty. every amnesty in the past weather in europe or in then united states has had the effect of attracting more people in the country illegally in the hopes of a future amnesty. lou: years ago i started talking about a rational, humane immigration policy that would take intocy account all of the concerns about displacement of those who were in this country illegally, a due process make a determination of how work permits and legal status occurred. that is not enough.th the activist groups in this country t insist upon one thing, it is remarkable demand in my eyes, they insist upon amnesty and this president is insisting upon amnesty. what is your reaction? >> what i worry about most is not amnesty, but incredibly successful campaign toma stigmatize any immigration enforcementti whatsoever.ha when you have opposition across the country to a program called s
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
it scandalous, grover cleveland's best friend and law partner was a guy named oscar fulsome. cleveland was born in new jersey and he spent most of his career in buffalo. he was a very successful lawyer and he and oscar were partners. they practice law together and they went out together and they would go out drinking and being together and it appears they enjoyed the services of maria halpern and together so when maria halpern and gets pregnant she has a son and neither knew who the father was. maria complicates things by naming the child oscar cleveland oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter, frances. wheatland was a bachelors of cleveland accepted the responsibility and put the child in an orphanage. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in a carriage accident. he is thrown from an apparently breaks his neck. he leaves a widow and a young girl frances and globe -- rover leave and make some enormous amount of money and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, pays for them and sets them up in a nice home, best friend and former law p
of gun laws in the world. when looking internationally, it is obvious that the one feature of america that would explain why we have so much more gun violence than the rest of the world is that we have incredibly permissive laws allowing the sale and possession of guns. with 5% of the world's population, we have 50% of the world's guns. we also have evidence that tightening laws, even in high videoistic countries with traditions of gun ownership, can and does reduce gun violence. in australia after a 1996 ban on all automatic and semiautomatic weapons, a real ban, not like the one we did in 1994 which had 600 plus exemptions, after that ban, gun-related homicides dropped by 59% over the next decade. all the evidence points in the same direction. there will always be evil or disturbed people and they might be influenced by some violent popular culture. but how is the government going to identify the darkest thoughts in people's minds before they do anything? what government can do easily, however, is make it much harder for these people to have access to guns. a few hours before the ne
how the two connect. well, this is my mother-in-law, and she was as old as the year, so she was 24 in 1924, when she was married. and i have a feeling that perhaps this was a special wedding present from her husband. i just wonder. it isn't the sort of thing parents would give. oh, no. far too-- far too flippant i would have thought for a parent. but, um, for a husband maybe. it might have been a wedding present. now, let's just have a look here, because i can see on a lot of the pots and the devices and the buffer and so on there's the initial "n." "n." she was nell. wonderful. her name was ellen but she was known as nell. and the hallmarks... well, they're different. i can see their different. they're very tiny. not easy to see. i can see they date from about 1926 through to about 1929. oh, so-- so it couldn't have been a wedding present, so, not a wedding present, but maybe an anniversary present or the birth-of- a-child present. but tell me a little bit about nell. i mean, it's lovely to hear a daughter-in-law saying that she was a lovely mother-in-law.
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
shooting in american history. does the tragedy in connecticut mean the country needs new gun laws? we'll have a fair & balanced look next. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. jamie: this just in. the u.s. marine veteran who spent four months behind bars in one of mexico most violent prisons is now home. this is my favorite christmas story because jon hammar was jailed in deplorable conditions on a questionable gun charge in mexico. he was taken to a u.s. hospital with flu-like symptoms. just arriving back at his family's home in florida. that is where steve harrigan is live in palmetto bay, florida. steve, what a christmas gift for this family. >> reporter: jamie, it was rashable to see here, four or five minutes ago
price. >> we have that with current epa. >> with the current epa laws. >> it's a de-facto to us. >> let's say we have that. what does that do to growth? what does that do to -- is that compatible with the continued growth of the american economy because the problem is, with juliet, what you said before, countries take a huge economic nosedive. the problem in selling it is precisely going around and telling people, hey, great news. we're going to tank the economy. >> i am actually a technology ee van gentlem evangelist. i think an economy with bright innovators, which happens to be the case with the united states, i think you can effective do what germany has done and actually having a high tax is not a problem, right? one of the central political problems in the united states is you have to raise tax revenue. why not raise tax revenue from a part of the economy where you want to discourage activity and use that for education. >> the private sector is sitting on more uninvested cash. this is not stock, not money given to owners. >> firms sitting on cash waiting to invest. they are waitin
of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of things that my colleague has said, but is also a failure because of the elements appear of corruption. soldiers are not paid on a regular basis. they are not sustained and read what in the field -- and reequippe
to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >> there are several lawmakers who are promising to introduce new gun control legislation, and the president formed a new team to come up with ways to limit assault weapons. >>> an idaho senator is apologizing after he was charged with driving under the investment. they arrested senator michael crapo early yesterday after he ran a red light. he failed several field sobriety tests and his blood alcohol level was .110 well above the legal leg legal limit. he's due in court january 4th. >>> just check out the scene
will create record vak kiss on the laws. >> which stocks specifically are going to suffer in home depot, radio shack, possibly shorts authority, some of the other office supply category killer stores. >> let me go in mr. glass half hull. anybody coming through had. as mentioned referenced so well. you also have you are even outfitters tutting it on ol centr retailers who have not reinvested back in the business are secularly having the shoppers shift away from them. they are going to have a tougher time. >> i think it's too late to save herb greenberg's bet with brian sullivan for this year, but you were on our show just recently, and you've turned positive for j.c. penney. >> i was a lot more positive at 17 than i do 21 and i do think the middle will do better than the upper end or the bottom. the upper end retailers will get hurt because of the tax rates and the lower end hurt because of social security taxes. guys in the middle will do better. the place to be will be the mossle so thenny's will have better numbers in q q4. >> felt like we were talking to stadler on this one. >> does that ma
in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
the nation's commerce. >> reporter: the sticking point in negotiations: a decades old law, called the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and t
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
to move out of the way. chinese law states drivers must give way to emergency vehicles on duty, but it took 40 minutes to get the patient to hospital just three kilometers away. she didn't make it. a doctor in the ambulance wrote in her blog that the situation was deplorable. many responded. one person said people can save lives by giving way to ambulances. another expressed disappointment in people's coldness. an expert says now is the time to change drivers' behavior. >> change the traffic regulation and more education to change the behavior of a driver by a combination of countermeasures together to change the situation. >> reporter: with so many cars on the road, campaigns to increase safety are bound to land. but gradually safety-conscious people are making inroads. takafumi terui, nhk world, beijing. >>> iran will conduct naval drills for six days in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf. the exercise is apparently meant to showcase its military strength in the world's vital oil and gas shipping route. iran's naval commander told reporters the drills will begin on frid
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
of law committee for the ocean. it is said that geography is one of the most important factors because it is the most permanent. we saw the arctic icecap drop and it appears to be opening more this session. what does this trend mean in a generation for russia and canada? >> i did go to zero chapters to it in the book. he is very provocative. in the middle of roberto they predicted china who was our ally would become our adversary geographically. also he said united europe could be a competitor for the united states. with the arctic icecap, if the arctic was open for shipping and a friend would sail the northwest passage up green land and across canada that shipping in the northern arctic that could provide alternative routes that is somewhat less of an emphasis of the indian ocean. to bring russia closer to america fundamentally. it would make canada significant you have shale guest, the tar sand and the hydropower resources with open arctic it would be that much more significant. >> i would like to offer a quick comment. to go through another level off from the decade. but with the ch
. >>> and this is interesting if you have been following the herbalife story. they're working with the law firm-by-schiller, in connection with the fight with billackman. shorting the company. last week he revealed he had been shorting the stock. the "wall street journal" saying it's not clear what counsel the corporate litigator could be offering herbalife, you can imaginin it's going to get tough and aggressive. at some point we've got to talk about julian -- julian robertson on twitter. if we'll consider that a headline. if he's on twitter -- >> did you know about this? >> no. >> there's a handle -- >> i've seen other people that it's obviously not them -- >> this could be him, though. and there's a big debate. a raging debate going on line about whether julian robertson is actually tweeting or not. you have a view? >> i -- i'm going shy away from this conversation other than -- >> we need to find out, though. >> other than to say it's a raging debate. >> i e-mailed him. this julian robertson -- >> how do you know you're e-mailing the right one? >> wow. >> because i have e-mailed with him pr
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